epiphany essay

epiphany essay

Paper instructions:
Which story’s main character undergoes the biggest “epiphany” in your opinion? Why? (In other words, which main character undergoes the biggest change?)

Specific examples and direct quotations from the stories below are HIGHLY REQUIRED plus an additional Works Cited page. Text: Kirszner, Laurie G., and Stephen R. Mandell. Lit. Boston: Wadsworth/Cengage, 2012. ISBN 1111348839. (use this text it must be exact)
Updike “A&P”
Boyle “Greasy Lake”
Joyce “Araby”
O’Brien “The Things They Carried”

Wright “Big Black Good Man”
(Tip: Your paper should be formatted like the sample student papers in the MLA section of your Brief Wadsworth Handbook (and in the literature book) with the same heading, spacing, etc.) )
In addition this check list is what am expecting:
Thesis
· Your thesis must list the topic and make a claim. A claim (an argument) must be arguable. If you can’t argue an opposite
or alternate to it, then your thesis is not a thesis.
· Everything in the paper answers to (ties back to) the thesis.

Paragraph Construction
General Facts about Paragraphs
· set of related sentences
· begin, end with important information
· serve as mini-essay within larger essay
· a paragraph will “make sense” as a whole; words, sentences related

Purpose of body paragraphs
· To introduce one of the main points supporting your thesis and to develop that point with examples, facts, and other supporting
evidence
· change in paragraphs indicate to reader that new idea is coming
· give the reader a rest; says to reader, “Have you got that? If so, I’ll go on.”
Unified
· Unified means paragraph has general idea and discusses ONLY that idea
· Readers have learned to expect a paragraph to contain this main idea
(Remember looking for main idea in grade school?)
· Topic Sentence
– acts as a mini-thesis
– a topic sentence usually works best at the beginning of a paragraph but can, at times, work at the end.
– For the kind of essays we’ll be writing, it works best at the paragraph’s beginning.
– if you look at a paragraph (yours or someone else’s and you can’t find the topic sentence easily, then something is wrong.
· Relate all other sentences to the paragraph’s main idea (topic sentence)
· Unified means that you avoid digression – If everything in your whole paper must answer to (tie back to) the thesis, then everything
in your paragraph must answer to the topic sentence.
· A paragraph that holds together is unified.
· To check to see that your paragraphs are unified, ask yourself these two questions.
Is there a main idea and do all the sentences relate to it?

Coherent
· Checking for coherence asks if the paragraph follows a logical order that the reader can see.
· A paragraph is coherent if the reader can see how it holds together.
· A coherent paragraph places information in the proper sequence.
· To achieve paragraph coherence: organize effectively
· There are many tried and true ways to organize a paragraph’s info in a logical manner – general to specific, specific to general.
The main thing is that the writer knows and the reader can see an organizational strategy – a plan within the paragraph.
· To make sure that your paragraphs are coherent, ask yourself this question. Can the reader easily see that the paragraph is unified?

epiphany

Paper instructions:
Which story’s main character undergoes the biggest “epiphany” in your opinion? Why? (In other words, which main character undergoes the biggest change?)

Specific examples and direct quotations from the stories below are HIGHLY REQUIRED plus an additional Works Cited page. Text: Kirszner, Laurie G., and Stephen R. Mandell. Lit. Boston: Wadsworth/Cengage, 2012. ISBN 1111348839. (use this text it must be exact)
Updike “A&P”
Boyle “Greasy Lake”
Joyce “Araby”
O’Brien “The Things They Carried”

Wright “Big Black Good Man”
(Tip: Your paper should be formatted like the sample student papers in the MLA section of your Brief Wadsworth Handbook (and in the literature book) with the same heading, spacing, etc.) )
In addition this check list is what am expecting:
Thesis
· Your thesis must list the topic and make a claim. A claim (an argument) must be arguable. If you can’t argue an opposite
or alternate to it, then your thesis is not a thesis.
· Everything in the paper answers to (ties back to) the thesis.

Paragraph Construction
General Facts about Paragraphs
· set of related sentences
· begin, end with important information
· serve as mini-essay within larger essay
· a paragraph will “make sense” as a whole; words, sentences related

Purpose of body paragraphs
· To introduce one of the main points supporting your thesis and to develop that point with examples, facts, and other supporting
evidence
· change in paragraphs indicate to reader that new idea is coming
· give the reader a rest; says to reader, “Have you got that? If so, I’ll go on.”
Unified
· Unified means paragraph has general idea and discusses ONLY that idea
· Readers have learned to expect a paragraph to contain this main idea
(Remember looking for main idea in grade school?)
· Topic Sentence
– acts as a mini-thesis
– a topic sentence usually works best at the beginning of a paragraph but can, at times, work at the end.
– For the kind of essays we’ll be writing, it works best at the paragraph’s beginning.
– if you look at a paragraph (yours or someone else’s and you can’t find the topic sentence easily, then something is wrong.
· Relate all other sentences to the paragraph’s main idea (topic sentence)
· Unified means that you avoid digression – If everything in your whole paper must answer to (tie back to) the thesis, then everything
in your paragraph must answer to the topic sentence.
· A paragraph that holds together is unified.
· To check to see that your paragraphs are unified, ask yourself these two questions.
Is there a main idea and do all the sentences relate to it?

 

Coherent
· Checking for coherence asks if the paragraph follows a logical order that the reader can see.
· A paragraph is coherent if the reader can see how it holds together.
· A coherent paragraph places information in the proper sequence.
· To achieve paragraph coherence: organize effectively
· There are many tried and true ways to organize a paragraph’s info in a logical manner – general to specific, specific to general.
The main thing is that the writer knows and the reader can see an organizational strategy – a plan within the paragraph.
· To make sure that your paragraphs are coherent, ask yourself this question. Can the reader easily see that the paragraph is unified?


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