Protocol for Diagnosis

Protocol for Diagnosis

Application: Protocol for Diagnosis, Management, and Follow-Up Care of Growth and Development and Psychosocial Issues
As pediatric patients grow from infancy to adolescence, there are many common growth and development and psychosocial issues that may potentially present. As an advanced practice nurse caring for these patients, you must be able to recognize red flags and select age-appropriate assessment and treatment options. In this Assignment, you prepare for your role in clinical settings as you design an age-specific protocol for the diagnosis, management, and follow-up care for a common growth and development or psychosocial issue.
To prepare:
• Reflect on the age group and the growth and development or psychosocial issue that you selected in Week 2.
• Think about the epidemiology of the issue.
• Consider an age-appropriate protocol for the diagnosis, management, and follow-up care of the issue you selected.
• Think about how culture might impact the care of patients that present with this issue.
To complete:
Write a 2- to 3-page paper that addresses the following:
• Explain a growth and development or psychosocial issue that might present in the age group you selected. Include the epidemiology of the issue in your explanation.
• Explain an age-appropriate protocol for the diagnosis, management, and follow-up care of this issue.
• Explain how culture might impact the care of patients who present with the growth and development or psychosocial issue you selected.

Case Study 1:
A mother brings in her 16-month-old, Brittany, for treatment of an acute illness. During the history, the mother reports that her mother-in-law is concerned about the toddler’s development. Further questioning reveals the following:
• Brittany was a term infant born vaginally with no intrapartum complications. Birth weight was 8 pounds 1 ounce and current weight is 26 pounds 9 ounces.
• She was breastfed until 12 months of age and now drinks 24 ounces of whole milk and eats table foods daily.
• Physical milestones are as follows: Rolled front to back at 6 months, developed pincer grasp at 11 months, crawled at 8 months, and began cruising at 10 months. She does not walk independently.
• Social development includes mimicking adult behavior, four-word vocabulary (mama, dada, baba, andno), follows one-step commands, and quiets easily when comforted.
Readings
• Burns, C. E., Dunn, A. M., Brady, M. A., Starr, N. B., & Blosser, C. G. (2013). Pediatric primary care (5th ed.). Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier.
o Chapter 5, “Developmental Management of Infants” (pp. 59–75)

This chapter explores aspects of normal development of infants including milestones and identifies developmental red flags.
o Chapter 6, “Developmental Management of Toddlers and Preschoolers” (pp. 76–91)

This chapter examines aspects of normal development of toddlers and preschoolers and identifies common developmental issues for patients in this age group.
o Chapter 10, “Nutrition” (pp. 166-185)

This chapter describes nutrition-related health problems in pediatric patients. It also provides guidelines for diagnosing and managing different types of nutrition disorders.
o Chapter 11, “Breastfeeding” (pp. 186-201)

This chapter examines the benefits, contraindications, and dynamics of breastfeeding. It also identifies common breastfeeding problems.
o Chapter 12, “Elimination Patterns” (pp. 202–217)

This chapter explores normal and abnormal patterns of bowel and urinary elimination. It also describes strategies for diagnosing and managing dysfunctional elimination syndrome.
o Chapter 14, “Sleep and Rest” (pp. 263–272)

This chapter provides strategies for the prevention and management of sleep problems in pediatric patients. It also identifies special considerations for children with chronic disorders.
o Chapter 17, “Role Relationships” (pp. 334–344)

This chapter explores circumstances that create role-relationship problems in family units such as violence, neglect, maltreatment, and physical and sexual abuse. It also presents strategies for assessing and managing families presenting with these circumstances.
• Hagan, J. F., Jr., Shaw, J. S., Duncan, P. M. (Eds.). (2008). Bright futures: Guidelines for health supervision of infants, children, and adolescents (3rd ed.). Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics.
o Review: “Promoting Healthy Nutrition” (pp. 121–145)

This chapter examines the impact of environment and culture on patient behaviors related to food and nutrition. It also explores essential components of nutrition for children from preconception through adolescence.
o Review: “Promoting Physical Activity” (pp. 147–154)

This chapter describes physical activity as a growing problem. It also identifies strategies for promoting physical activity, including age-appropriate activities for infants, children, and adolescents.
o Review: “Promoting Safety and Injury Prevention” (pp. 177–191)

This chapter explores two categories of issues relating to safety and injury prevention and examines strategies for promoting safety among infants, children, and adolescents.
o “Infancy” (pp. 253–380)

This chapter examines the care of infants. It focuses on wellness visits from prenatal to 11 months, identifying specific health issues, common parental concerns, and anticipatory guidance for parents.
o “Early Childhood” (pp. 381–461)

This chapter explores the care of children from ages one to four. It identifies issues related to their health, behavior, nutrition, and safety, as well as anticipatory guidance for family support.
• American Academy of Pediatrics. (2013). Immunization. Retrieved fromhttp://www2.aap.org/immunization/

This website provides information related to vaccines and diseases. It also presents strategies for helping families make immunization-related decisions.
• Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2013). Vaccines & immunizations. Retrieved fromhttp://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/

This website presents information related to immunizations including recommendations, requirements, preventable diseases, and side effects. It also provides updated policy statements regarding immunizations.

Readings
• Burns, C. E., Dunn, A. M., Brady, M. A., Starr, N. B., & Blosser, C. G. (2013). Pediatric primary care(5th ed.). Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier.
o Chapter 16, “Self-Perception Issues” (pp. 304–318)

This chapter describes normal patterns of self-perception and methods for assessing and managing healthy self-perception in children.
o Chapter 19, “Coping and Stress Tolerance: Mental Health and Illness” (pp. 358–386)

This chapter explores mental health in primary care. It also examines strategies for assessing and managing mental health disorders such as mood disorders, ADHD, eating disorders, and substance abuse.
• Hagan, J. F., Jr., Shaw, J. S., Duncan, P. M. (Eds.). (2008). Bright futures: Guidelines for health supervision of infants, children, and adolescents (3rd ed.). Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics.
o “Promoting Mental Health” (pp. 77–107)

This chapter focuses on promoting mental health and emotional well-being among children and adolescents. It identifies factors that impact mental health as well as strategies for assessing mental health in pediatric patients.
• Rockhill, C., Kodish, I., DiBattisto, C., Macias, M., Varley, C., & Ryan, S. (2010). Anxiety disorders in children and adolescents. Current Problems in Pediatric and Adolescent Health Care, 40(4), 66–99.
Retrieved from the Walden Library Databases.

This article explores the epidemiology, clinical presentation, assessment, and diagnosis of anxiety disorders in pediatric patients. It also examines treatment and management strategies, including resources for patients and their families and pharmacological interventions.
• American Academy of Pediatrics, Committee on Psychosocial Aspects of Child and Family Health and Task Force on Mental Health. (2009). The future of pediatrics: Mental health competencies for pediatric primary care. Pediatrics, 124(1), 410–421. Retrieved fromhttp://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/124/1/410.full.pdf+html?sid=b8a3f390-00f6-472c-a9ed-a8dc1c650ed3

This article describes skills, knowledge, and attitudes required by primary care clinicians to address and prevent mental health issues among children and adolescents in the United States. It also provides recommendations for maintaining a partnership with patients, caregivers, and families to ensure the well-being of children and adolescents.
Media
• Laureate Education (Producer). (2011b). Risk behaviors in adolescence. Retrieved from https://class.waldenu.edu

PLACE THIS ORDER OR A SIMILAR ORDER WITH US TODAY AND GET AN AMAZING DISCOUNT 🙂

Click the button below to order this paper.

order-now-button-red
money_back

Leave a Reply

*